Stockton JSNA


Obesity

Evidence base

 

Issue number

1 = highest priority

 

1

Source

Government Office for Science (GOV)

National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE)

Public Health England (PHE)

Title incl. web link

GOV: Foresight Report: Tackling Obesity, Future Choices. https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/287937/07-1184x-tackling-obesities-future-choices-report.pdf

NICE: Obesity Prevention CG43 (2015)

https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/cg43

PHE: Strategies for Encouraging Healthier ‘Out of Home’ Food Provision. A toolkit for local councils working with small food businesses

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/604912/Encouraging_healthier_out_of_home_food_provision_toolkit_for_local_councils.pdf

Summary

GOV: The complex relations between the social, economic and physical environments and individual factors that underlie the development of obesity.

NICE: The guideline covers preventing children, young people and adults becoming overweight or obese. It outlines how the NHS, local authorities, early years’ settings, schools and workplaces can increase physical activity levels and make dietary improvements among their target populations.

PHE: The toolkit summarises the evidence base, types of interventions, and emerging local practice, to help those responsible within local councils (councillors, health and wellbeing boards, planners, public health and environmental health), to think about how working in a systems approach, they might bring together a coalition of partners to improve the food environment for children and families.

2

Source

University of Leeds

Title incl. web link

University of Leeds: Tackling Child Obesity through the Healthy Child Programme: a Framework for Action

https://www.henry.org.uk/sites/www.henry.org.uk/files/2017-11/Framework-for-Action-tackling-child-obesity-through-the-Healthy-Child-Programme.pdf

Summary

The Framework for Action was developed through exploration and critical review of the evidence relating to the early indicators of lifestyle development. This led to the identification of strategic themes in the areas of parenting, eating behaviour, nutrition, play, screen time and sleep, with additional consideration of health and community professionals’ roles in promoting healthy lifestyle.

Source

NICE Eyes on Evidence, February 2016

Title incl. web link

 

Summary

Previous studies have shown that parents are likely to misperceive the weight status of their child (Lundahl et al. 2014) and suggest that parents may be reluctant to ‘label’ their child as overweight. This is concerning, because healthcare professionals often rely on parents to seek help for their overweight children

New evidence shows that parents were more likely to underestimate their child’s weight status if they came from more deprived regions, were black or of South Asian family origin, and if the child was older or male. This is concerning, because healthcare professionals and treatment services often rely on parents to seek help for their overweight children.

3

Source

Public Health England

Title incl. web link

A guide to community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/417515/A_guide_to_community-centred_approaches_for_health_and_wellbeing__full_report_.pdf

Summary

Community-centred approaches are not just community-based, they are about mobilising assets within communities, promoting equity and increasing people’s control over their health and lives. A new family of community-centred approaches represents some of the available options that can be used to improve health and wellbeing, grouped around four different strands:

  • strengthening communities
  • volunteer and peer roles
  • collaborations and partnerships
  • access to community resources

Source

Improvement and Development Agency

Title incl. web link

A glass half-full: how an asset approach can improve community health and well-being

http://www.scdc.org.uk/media/resources/assets-alliance/A%20Glass%20Half%20Full.pdf

Summary

A growing body of evidence shows that when practitioners begin with a focus on what communities have (their assets) as opposed to what they don’t have (their needs) a community’s efficacy in addressing its own needs increases, as does its capacity to lever in external support.

The second part of this publication offers practitioners and politicians, who want to apply the principles of community driven development as a means to challenge health inequalities, a set of coherent and structured techniques for putting asset principles and values into practice.

Source

BMC Public Health

Title incl. web link

Hillier- Brown FC, Bambra CL, Cairns JM, et al. A systematic review of the effectiveness of individual, community and societal level interventions at reducing socioeconomic inequalities in obesity amongst children. BMC Public Health 2014

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25113624

Summary

The review found only limited evidence although some individual and community based interventions may be effective in reducing socio-economic inequalities in obesity-related outcomes amongst children but further research is required, particularly of more complex, societal level interventions and amongst adolescents.

 

 

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